Training for Youth Offending Teams

YJLC support Youth Offending Teams by providing training on youth justice law. Our aim is to empower YOT workers with the knowledge they need to feel confident throughout criminal proceedings when liaising with lawyers, writing reports and addressing the court. All YOTs want to be able to provide children with clear and accurate information and support them to actively participate in any legal proceedings.

YJLC's training covers youth justice law and practice for Youth Offending Teams. The regularly updated training for practitioners covers key principles, out of court disposals, bail and remand, the youth court, the Crown Court, child criminal exploitation, fitness to plead & the latest changes to the law on sentencing children and what these mean in practice.

We aim to deliver tailored, accessible and affordable training to YOTs. We are also offering regional seminars enabling joint commissioning by clusters of Local Authorities. If your Local Authority would be interested in arranging a seminar in your area, please get in touch with the team at YJLC@justforkidslaw.org

I would like to add the immediate response to training from many who attended was very positive and the lawyer was praised as a very competent and knowledgeable trainer who had a relaxed and approachable persona.

Jayne Perkins, Senior Practitioner, West Mercia Youth Justice Service (in-house training delivered in March 2019)

YJLC is recognised as a centre of legal excellence in youth justice.

Our highly regarded CPD training courses cover all major aspects of the youth justice system and are delivered by youth justice specialist lawyers.

Footnotes

  • 1. ‘County Lines Exploitation: Practice guidance for Youth Offending Teams and frontline practitioners’, Ministry of Justice, published 15 October 2019, updated 6 January 2020, p5, https://bit.ly/2Hw2fuR
  • 2. Article 3, Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations (UN) Convention against Transnational Organized Crime. Note that ss2 and 3 MSA 2015 contain the relevant statutory definitions.
  • 3. ‘Criminal Exploitation of Children and Vulnerable Adults: County Lines’, Home Office, published 11 July 2017, updated 7 February 2020, https://bit.ly/3kZGHnW
  • 4. ‘Modern slavery’ includes child trafficking which includes CCE. (See: Modern Slavery Act 2015 - Statutory Guidance for England and Wales’, Home Office, version 2, January 2021, https://bit.ly/3bfiyIx
  • 5.a. b. ‘Modern Slavery Act 2015 - Statutory Guidance for England and Wales’, Home Office, version 2, January 2021
  • 6.a. b. ‘Criminal Exploitation of Children and Vulnerable Adults: County Lines’, Home Office, published 11 July 2017, updated 7 February 2020
  • 7. National Crime Agency National Briefing Report – ‘County Lines Violence, Exploitation & Drug Supply 2017’, NCA, November 2017, https://bit.ly/375mSqw
  • 8. Defence representatives may write directly to the SCA to request this information, with a signed consent from the child. Guidance for a Subject Access Request can be found here: https://bit.ly/2HzE4vA
  • 9. See a directory of human trafficking & modern slavery experts here: https://bit.ly/3fvIYGr
  • 10. The SCA has a target date of five working days from receipt of referral in which to make the RG decision
  • 11. Following the RG decision, the SCA has 45 days to gather further information. Once it has done so, it goes on to make the CG decision
  • 12.a. b. c. R v Brecani [2021] EWCA crim 731
  • 13.a. b. V.C.L and A.N v The United Kingdom (Applications nos.77587/12 and 74603/12)
  • 14. Law Society Practice Note – ‘Criminal prosecutions of victims of trafficking’, Law Society, December 2019, https://bit.ly/377MXoG
  • 15.a. b. See, for example, R v JXP [2019] EWCA Crim 1280
  • 16. ‘Modern Slavery Act 2015 - Statutory Guidance for England and Wales’, Home Office, version 2, January 2021, p140
  • 17. ‘Support provider’ means a body which is employed or engaged pursuant to the Victim Care Contract to provide care and coordination services for victims – see ‘ Modern Slavery Act 2015 – Statutory Guidance for England and Wales’, Home Office, April 2020
  • 18. See ‘Modern Slavery Act 2015 - Statutory Guidance for England and Wales’, Home Office, version 2, January 2021
  • 19. ‘Achieving best evidence (ABE)’ – the process by which a vulnerable victim or witness is interviewed in criminal proceedings – see ‘Achieving Best Evidence in Criminal Proceedings’, Ministry of Justice, 2011, at https://bit.ly/2J2toWQ
  • 20. ‘First response and the national referral mechanism’, College of Policing, published 28 July 2015, updated 9 June 2020, https://bit.ly/35XsbJg
  • 21. s34 Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994
  • 22. ‘Modern Slavery Act 2015 - Statutory Guidance for England and Wales’, Home Office, version 2, January 2021, p74
  • 23.a. b. R v S (G) [2018] EWCA Crim 1824
  • 24.a. b. c. [2020] EWCA Crim 285
  • 25. National Crime Agency Report – ‘County Lines Gang Violence, Exploitation & Drug Supply’, 2017
  • 26. National Crime Agency Intelligence Assessment – ‘County Lines Drug Supply, Vulnerability and Harm 2018’, NCA, January 2019, https://bit.ly/3l1f4e4
  • 27.a. b. c. d. CPS Legal Guidance – ‘Human Trafficking, Smuggling and Slavery’, CPS, updated 30 April 2020
  • 28. [2017] EWCA Crim 36
  • 29. [2018] EWCA Crim 1824
  • 30. R v S (G) [2018] EWCA Crim 1824, para76
  • 31. As stated in Article 8, European Union (EU) Directive 2011/36/EU, implemented in England & Wales by way of the CPS duty to review the prosecution of a VoT and the availability of the s45(4) MSA 2015 defence. The Court of Appeal, in DS, held that the availability of the statutory defence enables the state to discharge this obligation
  • 32. s44 Children And Young Persons Act 1933, which requires the courts to have regard to the welfare of a young person; s37 Crime And Disorder Act 1998, which requires the principal aim of agencies involved in the youth justice system to be the prevention of offending by young persons; and ‘The Code for Crown Prosecutors’, which states that Crown Prosecutors must consider the interests of a youth, amongst other public interest factors, when deciding whether a prosecution is needed
  • 33. CPS Legal Guidance – ‘Youth Offenders’, CPS, updated: 28 April 2020, https://bit.ly/339raf5
  • 34. See R v Chief Constable of Kent and Another ex p L, R v DPP ex p B [1991] 93 Cr App R 416
  • 35. ‘Recovery Needs Assessment’, Home Office, August 2020, https://bit.ly/3m2qmAa
  • 36. See R v L & N [2017] EWCA Crim 2129, [9]–[15], [33] & [52]
  • 37. See R v L & Ors [2013] EWCA Crim 991. The CPS is under an equivalent duty. They will be expected to proactively chase the NRM and typically will do so via the OIC
  • 38. Defence representatives should take a signed authority from the child enabling them to communicate directly with the SCA
  • 39.a. b. [2018] EWCA Crim 2995
  • 40. ‘Case sent to the Crown Court for trial – case management questionnaire’ (cm025), available from https://bit.ly/2HuiZm3
  • 41.a. b. R v DS [2020] EWCA Crim 285
  • 42. R v A [2020] EWCA Crim 1408
  • 43. s45(4) MSA 2015
  • 44. R v VSJ [2017] EWCA Crim 36
  • 45. [17-107]–[17-110] Archbold Criminal Practice 2021
  • 46. R v Bowen [1996] 2 CrAppR 157
  • 47. See R v N [2019] EWCA Crim 984, para20; R v LM [2010] EWCA Crim 2327, para47; R v L [2013] EWCA Crim 991, paras 14, 63; R v S (G) [2018] EWCA Crim 1824, para 59
  • 48. [2010] EWCA Crim 2327, para 47
  • 49. R v S (G) [2018] EWCA Crim 1824, para 59
  • 50. Article 26 (nonpunishment provision), Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings, May 2005
  • 51. Directive 2011/36/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 April 2011 on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims, and replacing Council Framework Decision 2002/629/JHA